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Webster's back! Come on in, there are some things he'd like to narrate for you.



























 

 





























All pictures from a picpams by totallybalancedand tasteofblame and from dhak.net.
 


RECAP: February 9, 1945. Haguenau, France. Webster’s back! And we’re in his pocket for this whole episode, so lucky us. Web’s been recovering since Crossroads, so he’s missed a lot. His VoiceOver says he knows of the heroism of the 101st in Bastogne through news reports. The news is also saying that the Allies have “broken the back of the enemy, and the war would soon be over.”

Web walks up to trucks carrying some of the men of Easy Company. He spots Luz, breaks into a smile and calls out to him, but Luz doesn’t immediately respond. Webster: “It’s me! Hey, I haven’t been gone that long!” Luz, “Jesus, yes you have.” Clue number one.

Webster approaches the next truck, which carries some of 1st Platoon, his platoon. He heaves his bag onto the truck. Bamber Sighting, BSG fans. Lieutenant Foley: “Whaddya want, Private?” Web apologizes and explains that he just got back from the hospital. Foley: “Good for you.” Heh. He’s so Lee Adama bitchy in this scene.

Web asks Martin, “Where are the rest of the guys?”
Martin: “This is everybody.” Clue number two.
Webster: “Come on, Sergeant Martin. Hoobler. Where’s he?”
Martin and Bull are silent. Clue number three.

Cobb mentions to Foley that 2nd Platoon has lost way more guys than 1st, so maybe they could use Webster. Which, on a scale of Cobb, isn’t even that mean. There’s, like logic and stuff. Foley agrees and kicks Webster to 2nd.

Webster loses a little of his happy face and moves on to the next truck to find 2nd . But there’s the smile again, as he approaches Liebgott, Babe, Grant, Jackson and Malarkey. He greets them sunnily and says he was told to report to 2nd Platoon. He gets on the truck.

Liebgott: “You must liked that hospital. Cause, uh, we left Holland four months ago.”
Webster: “Well I wasn’t in the hospital the whole time. There was rehabilitation, then the replacement depot…”
Liebgott: “I’m sure you tried to bust out and help is in Bastogne, Web.”
Webster: “I don’t know how I would have done that.”
Liebgott: “That’s funny, cause Popeye found a way. So did Alley, back in Holland. And Guarnere.”
Webster: “Yeah, where is Guarnere? Is he still your platoon sergeant?”

Jesus Christ, Web, you are a big, gorgeous dork and I love you, but stop smiling and stop asking where people are! (He’s got a lot of book learnin’, you know?)

Jackson: “Nah, he got hit.”
Babe: “Yeah, he got hit. Blew his whole leg off.”

Four clues is the magic number. Web stops talking.

Off the truck, Malarkey tells Webster to report to Speirs and ask him which platoon to go to. Fire overhead makes Malarkey flinch, but Web hits the ground. Malarkey chuckles.

Webster’s VO anvils that, even though he’s a veteran of D-Day and Market Garden, he’s being treated as a replacement and feels like he’s starting all over again.

Company CP. Lipton lies down on a couch and Luz tends to him, laying a blanket over him. Lip has pneumonia. Webster is sorry to hear that. Luz is adorable: “Whaddyou sorry about? He’s alive, he’s got a couch, he’s got a damn blanket. Snug as a bug.” Aw, look at Lipton. He’s not snug as anything.

Winters and Nixon are looking at the river. Hi boys! So many great two-shots of them, you know? Winters says Sink wants them to cross the river. So the Germans are on the other side of the river, is the inference. Winters worries that the full moon won’t give the mission any cover.

Back at CP, Lieutenant Henry Jones (Colin Hanks) is looking for Easy’s CO. Lipton tells him Speirs is on his way and offers him a seat and some coffee.

Nix and Winters are on their way too. Winters loves me: “You got any soap? I need a shave.” Yeah boy. Dick, you have the smoothest baby’s-bottom of a face in your whole battalion. Why don’t you throw a shaving party? I think all your men would feel better after they shaved. I know I would. :-D

Speirs comes into CP carrying an ornate silver clock or something, to prime us a little for his character development in the next episode, I guess. Jones snaps to attention. Lipton: “Captain Speirs, sir, this is Lieutenant Jones.”

Speirs ignores Jones and addresses Lipton: “Listen, for crissake, will you go back there in the back and sack out? There’s some beds with fresh sheets.” I just love the irritation in his voice as he tells Lipton to get some rest. After Breaking Point, I always notice these two together, and I think it’s sweet. And how often do we hear that level of annoyance in Speirs’ voice? Not a lot, is what I’m saying. It’s not very Speirs, just as his extra care with Lipton in the church at the end of Breaking Point is not very Speirs.

Lipton: “I will, sir. Just trying to make myself useful, sir.” Alive is super useful, Lip. Plus, I love Speirs ordering you to a bed. Go.

Winters and Nixon come in. Winters says Regiment wants a patrol across the river tonight to collect prisoners from a three-story building just up the embankment. Nix makes sure everybody knows that this is not his idea – it comes from Sink. Winters tells Speirs to pick 15 men, including a lead scout and a translator. The entire battalion will provide covering fire.

Wixon say they want it foolproof – as safe as possible. Take no chances. Not really Speirs’ strong suit, but I’m sure he’ll follow orders.

Nixon notices Jones: “Who are you?”
Are you guys bored with me loving Nixon? Cause I still do.
Jones: “Lieutenant Jones, sir.”
Nixon: “Riiight, our West Pointer. When did you graduate?”
Jones: “June 6, sir.”
Nixon: “June 6? Of last year?”
Jones: “D-Day, yes sir.”
Nixon laughs this awesome laugh. “Alright, don’t get hurt.”

Jones addresses Winters and volunteers for the patrol. Winters doesn’t answer. “Speirs, talk to you in an hour?”
Speirs says yes. He’s hunched over Lipton, asking his advice on which of the NCOs could lead the patrol. Lip has some ideas and Speirs listens intently. Mary draws a big red heart around them.

Jones asks Speirs if he may go on the patrol. Speirs says, “No. You don’t have any experience. Report to 2nd Platoon….Tell…Heffron…Ramirez and McClung they’re going.” He also dispatches Webster to 2nd, telling him to take the lieutenant with.

So, in case we’re not clear: Jones is a replacement; he gets no respect. Webster is being treated like a replacement; he gets no respect. They are drawn to each other in this episode by the sucking force of their huge voids of respect.

Oh, and before we move on…the actors are playing men who are sort of at the end of their rope. They’ve been through hell and they’re still nose to nose with the Germans, and it feels like they can’t take much more. You can see it on all of them. They’re tired, sad and dirty. (It provides helpful contrast to Webster and Jones, so fresh and so clean.) In particular, I like how Speirs is wearing this. The scruff, the messy hair. We haven’t seen him quite like this, even in Bastogne. And listen to his voice when he says “Tell.. Heffron…Ramirez and McClung…” Simple and businesslike, as always, but there’s a ragged edge to his voice.

Anyway, Jones and Webster are on their way to find 2nd Platoon. On the way, mortar fire. When they get there, Web introduces Jones to Malarkey. Jones notes that they’re without an officer and Malarkey says, “Not anymore, Lieutenant.” Jones starts to tell Malarkey about the patrol, and Malarkey leads him away from the men to talk. Liebgott takes Webster aside and the boys ask him what he knows about the patrol.

Jones asks Malarkey what kind of enemy contact they have here. “A few flares, mortars at night, scattered 88s, snipers during the day.”
Jones: “We dodged some mortars on our way in.”
Malarkey gives him this great look of “You don’t say!”, and just says, “Hmm.”

Liebgott is still grilling Webster about who’s going on the patrol. Webster gives in, reluctantly. “There are three men in this room that they think should be on the patrol.” Ha! You gotta love Webster. Such a dork. He asks them to promise not to tell that he told them. They promise. Cause, you know, they respect him so much. “Heffron. McClung. And you.” (He looks at Ramirez.) The three men are very bummed.

Malarkey comes over and starts to tell them about the patrol. “Yeah, we know. Web just told us.” Webster is shocked (!) that they have betrayed him in this way. *pets him and gives him a little log to write down his clues in*

Malarkey says PX rations just came in. And there are showers. Yeah, I was pretty excited too, but no.

Their building is hit, and they all run down the stairs and take cover under some tables. Then they head out toward the showers. On the way, they find that Bill Kiehn, a Toccoa man, was killed walking across the street with some potatoes. Eugene Roe ignores the spuds and tends to Bill, but he’s too late.

Lipton stops Malarkey and whispers to him. Malarkey huddles 2nd Platoon and gives them the roster for the patrol. Malarkey is lead, then Grant, Liebgott, Popeye, Jackson, Shifty and Webster. Liebgott grouses that it’s always 2nd Platoon. They protest Malarkey’s inclusion with sarcasm. "Christ, he only lost his five best friends. What the fuck's he got to live for?" Webster listens.

Cobb sees Webster in line for the showers. “Been a long time since your last shower, Professor?” Web is embarrassed and gets out of line. Bloody hell. Cobb is always an asshole, but now it’s starting to affect me personally.

Because…Malarkey? There’s a shower scene in Band of Brothers and I get Malarkey? Oh, and Liebgott’s head. Really? I’m just saying…don’t any of the officers need a shower?

I’m over the loss of Web anyway, because he is clearly very clean. And look at that hair. His hair will not quit in this episode. They must have had some product and a blow dryer back at the replacement depot.

No, it’s cool. No one loves Malarkey better than I, so I am really happy to see him get a shower. Plus, look at his little face. I think that’s one of the iconic shots of the series. All that pain in one expression. He needs more than a shower, but I’m really glad he’s getting one.

Web and Jones discuss their cleanliness and Malarkey’s need for a giant break. Web says Jones should replace Malarkey on the patrol. Jones says no, the CO wants experience; Web says the rest of the team already has that. Jones consults Malarkey as Webster watches (dude, you’re such a stalker this ep!) and then Jones goes off to volunteer again.

Luz is at CP, counting PX rations. Martin wants 10 or 15 chocolate bars. Luz gives him a pack of Juicy Fruit instead. This makes Cobb happy, of course. Luz gets word from Vest that he’s supposed to put a few bazooka rounds into a house across the river.

Liebgott, Webster and Jones come in. Liebgott also wants a Hershey bar. Luz protests that there aren’t enough to go around.

Perconte is back!
Luz: “How you feelin’?”
Perconte: “As long as you keep your hands off my ass, I’ll be fine.”
Luz tosses Perconte a Hershey bar.
Liebgott: “He gets a fuckin Hershey bar?”
Luz: “Well he got shot in the ass!”
Martin walks over to greet Perconte. “Want I should rub it for you?”
Jones looks squicked. My, you’re not going to last long around here, Henry.

Web finally seems like he’s getting it. Perconte was shot and then broke out of the hospital within weeks, so he gets the warm welcome. Check.

Perconte has heard that the “Krauts are finished.”
Liebgott: “Well, just to make sure, we gotta row across the fuckin river tonight, grab a few, and ask them in person.” Perconte: “Are you kidding me?”

Luz remembers that he needs Web to take a box of grenade launchers to OP2 for the patrol tonight. He hands Web a box and then tosses a few more things on top of it. Liebgott squeezes Web’s bicep. “You been workin out?”

Heh. I do have a soft spot for Webster, but I also sorta like the way Liebgott plays with him and uses him through this whole episode. Maybe it’s something about scrappy little Liebgott with the sweet face and all the blood he’s had on him so far, and all the shit he’s going to see in the next episode. I can’t really dislike him, even when he’s being a bitch to Webster, who really doesn’t deserve any of it. But who is definitely asking for it, let’s be clear. There is a difference.

Now here’s somebody I can dislike. Cobb: “Hey, Vest, what you got in there? More Hershey bars and Lucky Strikes for your rear echelon fuckster hoard, huh?”

Ok, I don’t even know what that means. Cobb is such an asshole he needs a whole new set of vocabulary words to express himself now.

Luz: “Hey, hey, hey, Cobb, with the mouth please. The kids just tryin’ to do his job, alright? Jesus Christ.” Luz decides that blowing up a house sounds like a lot less trouble than dealing with these kindergarteners, and takes off. Web, Jones and Vest go with him. The remaining boys pounce on the rations.

Winters and Speirs stand by the river, planning the patrol. Jones comes up behind them and interrupts them, volunteering for the patrol a third time. Winters turns to look at Jones. Jones says he could use the experience. Now, if you were interviewing a man for a job, and his pitch was about what the job would do for him, would you hire him? No, Winters wouldn’t either.

“Denied. Anything else?” Speirs turns, so now they’re both looking at Jones over their shoulders. Look at these two. Heck, even I’m scared. And a little turned on. “You’re not going to lead that patrol, Jones.” They both turn away.

Jones takes a step toward Winters’ back. “Permission to speak, sir.” Winters makes a subtle but awesome eye-roll and WTF face, before turning to look over his shoulder again. Jones says that Sergeant Malarkey could use a break. Vest scurries up and asks Winters if he can go on the patrol too. I think being a CO is a lot like being a mom. Vest says the war’s nearly over and he hasn’t done anything but deliver mail and type reports. Winters says, “Absolutely.”

Winters leans back very cutely toward Speirs. “He’s got a point about Sergeant Malarkey.” Speirs: “Yeah, a point.” Hee. Love him. He doesn’t see the point. His brain is all, “Malarkey. Probability of success: 87%. Jones: Probability of success: 36%. Does not compute. Defer to Winters. Resume planning mission.”

So Jones can go, but neither officer is even considering letting him lead it.

Briefing, CP. Everyone tapped for the patrol so far is here, around what used to be some French family’s dining room table. The men glare at Jones and hope he’s not going to be leading the patrol. Cobb and a few others come in. Winters and Martin come in. Jones calls the room to attention. Winters immediately puts them at ease. Their feet go back up on the table.

Winters says Jones will go as an observer. He nods to Web, who acknowledges his thanks. Martin sees this. Winters says Martin will lead. Martin glares at Webster, who makes himself look even more innocent than usual. Which is to say, ridiculous.

The team will go across in four boats. Their target is three prisoners from the house on the embankment. They’ll set a time-delayed charge to blow the building after they leave. The battalion will cover their withdrawal; the patrol are to blow whistles once they’re back in the boats, and our guns will open up on the German side. Winters asks Martin to pick an assault team.

Martin spits, “McClung. Sisk. Cobb. Garcia. Webster.” The rest will provide a base of fire. Martin confirms that Web speaks German. “Yeah. A little bit.”

Liebgott, to Jackson, so Webster can hear. “A little German? His German’s as good as mine.”

Webster is teachable. He runs outside and stops the officers and says that there are now 16 men on the team; they had intended to choose 15. And that one way of looking at it is that Liebgott is an extra interpreter.

Speirs stops Liebgott. “Liebgott. You wanna sit this one out?” “Yes sir.” Liebgott winks at Webster. “Thanks, buddy!” Look how cute he is. I love you, you manipulative little brat.

The men spend the evening relaxing and cleaning their weapons. By which I mean cleaning their weapons. Web VO says that the veterans put the mission out of their minds. But thinking about not thinking about the mission is thinking about the mission, Web. I don’t think this voiceovering is working for anybody. But you’re still pretty. Look at that boy. He’s got face for days.

The patrol. They set off. No helmets on this one, which, yikes. I’m scared for them. Cobb’s boat capsizes and they’re left behind. So I guess they won’t be snarking the Germans into submission; will have to rely on guns.

Martin leads the men from the boats. He sends teams to the flanks to provide fire. The assault team approaches the house. Martin fires through a second floor window. Jackson run up the stairs and throws a grenade into the house. Martin, behind him, yells “Jackson, wait!” Jackson runs through the door and is blown back by his own grenade.

Chaos inside. People are tending to Jackson as others are trying to secure the prisoners. Martin yells at them to shut up in English. Webster yells at them to shut up in German. Web sets the timed charges. They move out.

Moving toward the boats, Grant tosses the whistle to Jones. Jones seems to jump the gun a little. He blows the whistle and the allied side starts to fire on the German positions. The men run through heavy fire back to the boats, and pull the boats across as bullets whistle over their heads.

They’re back over the river, inside. Jackson’s on a table, bleeding from his face and mouth. The prisoners are in an alcove, getting yelled at by Babe. Martin tells Jones he’s in charge, and goes to find a medic. (Why wasn’t there a medic just on this side of the river, when they came back?)

Jackson’s writhing and screaming, and the men are trying to get him to be still. Vest is sorta demonstrating why they don’t let him go on any combat missions by screaming that Jackson’s gonna die. Webster assures Jackson that he’s doing no such thing. Vest freaks out, draws his sidearm, and points it at the prisoners. Jones pulls Vest off, then Babe, yelling that they’re not going to be the reason for losing one of the prisoners.

Gene comes in to tend to Jackson. As aunt_deen pointed out to me, when Gene puts his hands on Jackson, he abruptly goes calm and cooperates. The men quiet down and stand back. Gene says they have to move him. They get him on a stretcher. Jackson starts screaming again and moving, so they lower him to the floor again. Gene holds his face as Jackson stops moving. He’s dead. Martin brings a blanket and puts it over him.

Daylight. They load the prisoners onto a truck. As Jones stands by, Martin reports to Winters that they lost Jackson. Winters: “Well executed. It’s not your fault. Talk to your men.”

Cobb is looking across the river. There’s someone yelling from the other side. Jones, Martin and Webster come up.
Cobb: “You leave someone on the bank?”
Martin: “Yeah. Yeah, we did.”
Jones: “It’s that third prisoner that was too far gone to bring back.”
Webster: “Maybe we should put him out of his misery.” Of course that’s what Web wants.
Cobb: “Fuck his misery.” And Cobb never fails to disappoint.
Martin: “I can’t listen to it anymore.” He walks away.

The men are inside, around a table, smoking and drinking. Cobb has his own bottle and is standing against the wall.
Cobb: “Whatcha lookin’ at, Webster?”
Webster looks down. He really wasn’t looking at anybody in the first place. You know I would tell you if he were.
Cobb: “Yeah, that’s what I thought, college boy.”
Jones: “Are you drunk, trooper?”
Cobb: “Leave me alone.”
Jones: “Answer the question.”
Cobb: “Yes, sir. I am drunk, sir. Drunk, sick and tired of fuckin patrols, takin orders…”
Martin: “Hey, Cobb. Shut up. It’s boring, ok?”
Cobb: “Takin his side, Johnny?”
Martin doesn’t turn back to look at him. “Yeah. I am.”

So I think that’s that. Webster’s back in. Jones is in. You can see it just by the way Jones is sitting.

Daytime. The river. Another beautiful portrait of Nix and Winters.
Winters: “So he knows we lost a man?”
Nixon: “Yeah. He knows. He also knows you picked up two prisoners who talked.”
Winters: “About what?”
Nixon: “OB, supply trouble, Hitler’s favorite color….I don’t know. None of it gets us across the river.”
Winters: “What’s the point?”
Nixon: “Honestly? Sink’s been on the phone all day, bragging it up. I think he’s just showing off now… You gave him a successful patrol; now he wants two.”
Speirs comes up and confirms that they’re going to brief the men. “Same roster as last night. Well…mostly.”

Sink arrives, talking about the damn fine job they did and how damn sure they should be to tell the men how damn proud he is.

Winters tells Speirs he’ll brief the men himself.

All the men assigned to the patrol are sitting around a table. Winters tells them about the pride, but without the damns. Winters is proud; Sink is proud. The men have earned themselves another pointless and life-threatening mission. The team will have to go further into town this time. They have a new house target. But they’re setting off from the same place. Martin is politely incredulous that they’re not changing the plan at all. Winters pauses and says that it will be 0200 hours instead of 0100. Yeah, that’ll throw the Germans off.

“Clear?”
“Yes sir.”
“Good. Because I want you all to get a full night’s sleep tonight. Which means that, in the morning, you will report to me that you made it across the river but you were unable to secure any live prisoners. Understand?”
“Yes sir.”
“Good. Look sharp for tomorrow. We’re moving off the line.”

Which helps this make a lot more sense to me, Winters being who he is. It’s not just that the risk/reward ratio is messed up. They are literally one night from relative safety --- moving back and maybe finishing the war without another significant engagement. For these guys who have paid so dearly, the last patrol seems tragically reckless.

The men are amazed and overjoyed. Jones nods. Yes, we get it. In two days, he’s learned lessons that he will carry with him for the rest of his life. It’s just that he really didn’t have to NOD for me to get that. Sorry, this episode lays it on a little thick sometimes.

Outside, Speirs is characteristically unmoved. Nixon is having a ball. He is so proud of his boyfriend he can barely contain himself. He tells Speirs, “Don’t bother writing this up, I’ll take care of it. I might actually enjoy it. I think you might be onto something, Dick…”

BOOM, the house across the river blows up.

CP. Luz is there, possibly dealing with what’s left of the rations. He’s staring into the officers’ room. Web and Skinny come in to see Luz; Luz leans so he can look past them and keep watching what’s going on in with the officers.

Winters, Nixon, Speirs, Jones and Welsh (hi, Harry!) are gathered around Lipton.
Winters: “First Sergeant Lipton? Your honorable discharge as an enlisted man and your battlefield commission to Second Lieutenant.”

Web and Skinny turn to see what Luz is looking at. All the officers are smiling. Nixon lets out a big chuckle. Lipton smiles and shakes each hand, ending with Harry. “Welcome back, sir.” Welsh: “Ah, it’s Harry to you.”

Lipton is bursting with pride. He grins sheepishly at the boys in the other room. Luz is a little verklempt. Me too. Speirs touches Lipton on both arms and leads him away from the group, which reminds me of Joe and Billy in Hard Core Logo, but then I’m clearly high on Lip and Speirs today so don’t mind me.

Winters tells Jones that Regiment has promoted him to First Lieutenant and he’s wanted there on staff. Luz: “Guess we lost another platoon leader, huh Web?”

Web VO says that, as they pulled out of Haguenau, they felt that a corner had been turned, and that they might actually make it out of the war alive. Which is what one of the vets (not telling who) said in the open. Which is what Winters and Nixon have been implying all episode, with the “no unnecessary risks” stuff and the calling off of the patrol. Throughout this episode, Web’s VO is a little heavy and redundant, but I don’t mind. He’s dorky and a little slow on the uptake, despite the big brain. But he’s so kind and earnest, and if he wants to tell me stuff I already know, that’s fine with me. Especially if I get to look at him while he says it.

Nix stops Winters before they pull out.
“Oh, before I forget, Sink’s a bit unhappy with the appearance of your uniform. He says it’s not befitting your rank.” Nix tosses Winters a box, containing Oak Leaves. He salutes. “Congratulations, Major.” He smiles and walks away.

Aw. Nixon can be so lame when he’s emotional. He’s normally a bit dry, but sometimes around Dick he’s all making bad jokes and kicking pebbles and shit.

Jones nods to Web as he gets into his jeep. I’m surprised that Web’s VO doesn’t feel the need to explain to us that Jones is grateful for his help and that this experience has made him a better officer. Gee, I hope I’m interpreting that nod right.

Web goes to a truck. Liebgott’s at the back. Web starts to haul himself in, but Liebgott gives him a hand up and a then a pat on the butt. Probably just for me. So they’re going to be ok too. Got it.

Web’s VO is not done with us yet. But he has something to say that I didn’t know already! And that is that, at this point, standards of living in the States were already starting to rise. People were beginning to live as if there weren’t a war going on. As he says this, the camera pulls up above Haguenau. A column of men walking down the street scatters to avoid incoming fire. Web’s VO wonders whether anyone who hadn’t been here could appreciate the price these men paid to win the war.

The tag says that the war had so far taken Easy from England to France, Holland and Belgium. Next up: Germany.
 


Poll #1315893 The Last Patrol

Shower Scene: The Director’s Cut.

Winters and Nixon.
1(4.0%)
Speirs and Lipton, but only if he’s feeling better.
3(12.0%)
Speirs and Winters.
4(16.0%)
Buck drops by for a shower.
0(0.0%)
Webster, Talbert, Roe, Liebgott, Luz and Babe.
6(24.0%)
Malarkey’s the one who deserves that shower. The shower is for him, not for your perverse entertainment! Freak. 
6(24.0%)

Worst WTF Moment:

Lipton has pneumonia!
0(0.0%)
There’s going to be a stupid patrol across the stupid river and it’s not Nixon’s fault.
2(7.7%)
Bill Kiehn dies for potatoes.
2(7.7%)
Jackson is hit by his own grenade.
5(19.2%)
Jackson dies.
5(19.2%)
A German prisoner has been left to die by the river.
1(3.8%)
Another patrol?
3(11.5%)

Best OMG Moment:

Perconte is back!
1(4.0%)
Harry is back!
1(4.0%)
Winters defies Sink’s order and calls off the second patrol.
20(80.0%)

Best Bromantic Moment:

Speirs is angry that Lipton isn’t taking better care of himself.
4(15.4%)
Speirs asks Lipton for advice on the patrol.
1(3.8%)
Martin offers to rub Perconte’s ass.
0(0.0%)
Liebgott admires Webster’s muscles.
0(0.0%)
Webster gets Malarkey out of the patrol.
0(0.0%)
Webster gets Liebgott out of the patrol.
0(0.0%)
Liebgott winks at Webster and thanks him.
0(0.0%)
Martin sticks up for Jones.
0(0.0%)
Winters calls off the second patrol.
0(0.0%)
Nixon is proud of Winters for calling off the patrol.
1(3.8%)
Lipton is promoted as some of the boys look on.
1(3.8%)
Nixon gives Winters his Oak Leaves.
2(7.7%)
Jones silently thanks Webster for his help.
0(0.0%)
Liebgott helps Webster onto the truck.
3(11.5%)

If I were giving out rations, you could so have a Hershey bar.

Luz
4(16.0%)
Lipton
3(12.0%)
Liebgott
2(8.0%)
Webster
1(4.0%)
Jackson
0(0.0%)
Winters
0(0.0%)
Nixon
0(0.0%)
Malarkey.
6(24.0%)

No Hershey bar for you.

Sink
6(24.0%)
Cobb
12(48.0%)
Whoever decided to leave the German prisoner on the river bank.
1(4.0%)

 

Comments

( 40 comments — Leave a comment )
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anatolealice
Dec. 16th, 2008 04:05 am (UTC)
Ooh, goody. I have this disc now! I'm not too far behind.
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 04:22 am (UTC)
Hooray! And this will be my last entry until after Christmas, so you'll have plenty of time to catch up and wander through the threads and comment. :-)
(no subject) - anatolealice - Jan. 12th, 2009 09:57 am (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - marymary - Jan. 12th, 2009 05:32 pm (UTC) - Expand
tomfoolery815
Dec. 16th, 2008 05:12 am (UTC)
I know Mary will get this, and some of the rest of you may as well: This episode reminded me a lot of the "Torn" episode of BSG. People deciding worthiness based on You Were There, or You Weren't.

It's lousy that Web gets treated this way. Because he's not some replacement, or Jones. He's one of them. A Toccoa Man. But, as in "Torn," the psychological scars, the PTSD manifests itself in lashing out at the people who didn't endure what the veterans of Bastogne did.

You're right, M, that Web requires waaay too many calls on the clue phone before he gets it.

Nixon laughs this awesome laugh. “Alright, don’t get hurt.”
That? May be the funniest moment in the whole miniseries. Not that this is an Oscar Wilde script, but there is a fair amount of comedy amid the bravery and horror. I think every episode has at least one funny moment. (Even the next one.)

But Nix is telling this to a West Pointer. And, of course, it's RL's delivery, and the look on his face, that make it art.

Web and Jones discuss their cleanliness
They're SO clean compared to the others, who are grimy and haggard. (Winters excepted, of course.) It's as if they're lit differently.

I appreciate Colin Hanks' performance a lot more this time around. Must be the Mad Men experience talking.
tomfoolery815
Dec. 16th, 2008 05:27 am (UTC)
Martin doesn’t turn back to look at him. “Yeah. I am.”
So I think that’s that. Webster’s back in. Jones is in. You can see it just by the way Jones is sitting.

Yeah, Cobb's a bit of Kara and a bit of Tigh in this one, isn't he?

Which is why I appreciated Martin "takin' his side." Becuase he wasn't, really. And it's all the better, since Martin had been one of the ones, just the day before, pissed at Webster for, apparently, having the stones to get shot before Bastogne and Foy instead of during one of them. (I know, I know. But even given his cluelessness, Web deserved better.) Web had re-established himself on the patrol across the river.

Speaking of BSG ...
Foley: “Good for you.” Heh. He’s so Lee Adama bitchy in this scene.
Ha! He is, isn't he? (Another fantastic recap, Mary. Thank you for all your effort. :-)

Speaking of Little Hanks, as I was *points upward* ... Jones is attempting to play the part of an officer, but you see him swallow hard when Dick describes the patrol. Then, when the boys are removing any shine from their equipment -- accompanied by haunting solo piano -- his eyes are about to pop out of his head.

So it's excellent that, amid the chaos with Jackson and the POWs, that's its Jones who finds himself as a soldier and leader, and forcefully convinces Vest to not make an awful situation even worse.
aunt_deen
Dec. 16th, 2008 09:35 am (UTC)
Webster is definitely a dork. And he needs to be whacked with that log full of clues repeatedly.

But he's like that dorky kid in my class who gets pushed around by the cool kids. I want to hit the pause button, point out his exact behavior that is getting him into trouble and then push play again so he'll get along better.

Seriously, that scene at the beginning when he's greeting everyone is just painful to watch. Because he heard the news reports calling them the "battered bastards of Bastogne." (They could say that in the newspapers back then?) He's been in combat. He knows they've been through frozen hell, even if he doesn't know the details. And still he's smiling and waving and asking where everyone is.

Sheesh.

Lipton lies down on a couch and Luz tends to him, laying a blanket over him. Lip has pneumonia. Webster is sorry to hear that. Luz is adorable: “Whaddyou sorry about? He’s alive, he’s got a couch, he’s got a damn blanket. Snug as a bug.” Aw, look at Lipton. He’s not snug as anything.

I love this scene. Webster pokes his head in cautiously, doubtless wary of more contempt. But Luz throws his usual snark around in an offhanded way, which is to say he treats Webster like he treats everyone else. And Lip, of course, is nice as can be, telling Web to have a seat and they'll get him situated.

And yes, the Lipton/Spiers thing is awesome. It's just possible that Spiers regards Lipton as more than a valuable commodity to be exploited in battle and actually ... you know... likes him. It's sweet.

And Mary, I share your sigh with the showers. I appreciate that scene only because I can appreciate how welcome a hot shower would be after weeks and weeks of crouching in freezing holes in the ground where you have to break ice (hi, Dick!) to get to water for washing. I'm very glad to the men got to shower.

But in their boxers? Seriously? There were one or two men who stripped all the way but why the hell would they leave their boxers on to shower? They're gonna have to take 'em off to put on the clean uniform anyway. Wouldn't you think that the area beneath the boxers is in dire need of cleansing as much (or more) than everywhere else?

Totally aside from my shallow desire to see Easy in their altogether, it makes no sense.

More later.
misreall
Dec. 16th, 2008 03:18 pm (UTC)
I loved this episode for a lot of reasons, but one of them was that when I first saw it terribly worried about Colin Hanks. I found the sight of his face distracting, and all I could think about was stunt casting. I liked being proved wrong. Once I actually got used to seeing him, and therefore didn't really see him any longer, he was actually quite good.

The patrol not going across the river is one of the high points of the series. It is the kind of thing that they do in movies all of the time, but it isn't earned. There is no emotional payoff. By the time they don't go across the river not only have they earned it, but we have earned it with them. They deserve to sleep and we deserve a few minutes of not worrying that someone else we have come to care for is going to get killed or maimed.

Oh, and Webster is such a big dork. He is that totally intellectual boy you knew in college who just had no idea that the world wasn't like what he had been reading about since he was 15 and discovered literature and philosophy. If he had been born just a little later he would have probably been one of those guys that read On The Road and decided to emulate Kerouac.

Not that any of that is bad. They are just the last guys you expect to find in a war.
tomfoolery815
Dec. 16th, 2008 03:42 pm (UTC)
I'm very glad to the men got to shower. But in their boxers? Seriously?
Aunt_Deen, I'm guessing it's actually what they did, that this is some kind of commentary on the modesty of (most of) these men. That that's as much as they were willing to take off in what is still a fairly open area in the middle of a town in a foreign country.

I found the sight of his face distracting, and all I could think about was stunt casting.
Or just plain nepotism. I had the same thought, Misreall.

I liked being proved wrong.
Me, too.

Not that any of that is bad. They are just the last guys you expect to find in a war.
Certainly true. I think he's the only college-educated enlisted man we meet in this whole series, so he might as well be from another planet. The men of Easy often treat him as such.

There's often an underlying "You think you're better than me?" tone to what the men say to Web. Which is unfortunate, because he doesn't think he's better than them. In his naivete, he feels like one of the boys. Which he should, because he is.

The patrol not going across the river is one of the high points of the series.
Excellent point! It really is. We've established that these are brave men who would risk their lives for each other. We don't need it proven to us again.

I like the point the Real Men of Easy make. They could tell that the end was near, that they were going to be on the winning side, and they wanted to avoid unnecessary risk. As if we needed another reason to love Winters; he wants to avoid such risk, too.
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 04:36 pm (UTC)
There's often an underlying "You think you're better than me?" tone to what the men say to Web. Which is unfortunate, because he doesn't think he's better than them. In his naivete, he feels like one of the boys. Which he should, because he is.

Yeah, I agree, Tom. And aunt_deen. Webster's a really interesting character, made even more interesting when you learn about him in real life. He had a very strong philosophical perspective to the war. He wanted to be an enlisted man, he didn't want to be promoted; he wasn't an excellent soldier, but then he wasn't ambitious. He refused to let his parents use their connections to get him out of service. He did, in fact, want to put that German prisoner out of his misery and volunteered to go across the river and do so, even though he generally didn't volunteer for anything.

After the war, he wrote that what it had taught him was to get along with people. Which is, I think, a very interesting answer.

ALL of that is well portrayed by Eion Bailey and those who wrote his character. He really does hit that note of being both smart and naive. I like the way his face is always so open. Literally: even his mouth is actually open a lot. *g* And I think it's right that EB plays him as so gullible. He's a very good looking boy who's well-off and smart. He's probably treated pretty well by people, in general. He expects people to be nice to him, and fair.

And they show that, though he doesn't consider himself better than the other men, his mind is always "above" them in a way. In the sense that he's always thinking about the war, his comrades, and noticing small moments. This episode's narration, while imperfect, does give us the sense of Webster as an observer of the experience, which he was. There is a book of his letters and writings on the war, but I haven't read it yet.

Which is why I appreciated Martin "takin' his side." Becuase he wasn't, really. And it's all the better, since Martin had been one of the ones, just the day before, pissed at Webster for, apparently, having the stones to get shot before Bastogne and Foy instead of during one of them.

I see where you're getting this, as Martin was on the first truck that Webster approached. He and Bull just sort of stared when Webster asked about Hoobler. But I didn't really count Martin as one of the ones giving Webster a hard time, like Liebgott or Babe or Cobb. Martin DOES burn a hole through Webster with that glare later on, but there's cause: Webster's manipulations had put Martin in charge of the patrol. And I think their problem with Webster is not that he was wounded before Bastogne, but that he didn't break out of the hospital and rejoin them.

That look of Martin's is just priceless, isn't it? I've never seen a face like that in my life. I have a great screencap of his glare at Webster, but (as you can see) I had plenty of others and at some point it gets ridiculous.
tomfoolery815
Dec. 16th, 2008 04:48 pm (UTC)
But I didn't really count Martin as one of the ones giving Webster a hard time, like Liebgott or Babe or Cobb. Martin DOES burn a hole through Webster with that glare later on, but there's cause: Webster's manipulations had put Martin in charge of the patrol.
Right. I did see that look; it's an all-time great I Will Kill You With My Eyes face, isn't it? I knew what it was about. Web was all sheepish body language reply, because he didn't think it through. I was putting Martin in a more general category of Has Issues With Webster.

And I think their problem with Webster is not that he was wounded before Bastogne,
Right. My comment was supposed to be snarky-funny, but wasn't.

but that he didn't break out of the hospital and rejoin them.
It's an awfully high standard, isn't it? It would never have occurred to Webster to do that.

I'm sure to him, having been raised in a household where education was valued and respected, he wasn't supposed to leave the hospital until the doctor told he to go.

Edited at 2008-12-16 04:48 pm (UTC)
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 04:52 pm (UTC)
It is the kind of thing that they do in movies all of the time, but it isn't earned.

This is a great point, misreall. You're right about the ways in which it is earned. And I can add one more way, which is Winters. If Nixon had made a decision to fake a patrol, it would be fun, but different. Nixon's perspective is different. He is the one who sees what is, sometimes, the craziness and futility of the whole thing. And he's WAY less reverent and bound to duty than Winters is.

Winters embodies order. He takes orders, he gives orders, he believes in each order because they make up the system that works to win the war. The men are all serving a higher goal, which is to liberate the world from the Nazis. Orders are followed to make that happen. Not blindly; for a reason. To make the system work, to serve the goal.

And I'm going out on a limb here, but I think the military syncs nicely with Winters' humble and collectivist nature. Whereas Nixon is an individualist --- more stereotypically American, Winters comes from a community that values hard work and service. God and community before yourself.

So, in that way, Winters himself has earned the right to take exception to one order. Which makes it more surprising and delightful to the men, to Nixon :-) and to us.
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 05:00 pm (UTC)
I'm sure to him, having been raised in a household where education was valued and respected, he wasn't supposed to leave the hospital until the doctor told he to go.

Right, because doctors and hospitals are good and they help you and they would never tell you anything that's wrong. It brings up a larger class issue. You can argue that when the system works for you, you follow the rules. When the system doesn't work for you, you don't. Following the rules has probably worked great for Webster, all his life. Most of the other guys had had relatively hard or at least modest lives before the war. Maybe their allegiance to the system is not as strong as Webster's.
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 05:13 pm (UTC)
I love this scene. Webster pokes his head in cautiously, doubtless wary of more contempt. But Luz throws his usual snark around in an offhanded way, which is to say he treats Webster like he treats everyone else.

Yes! to aunt_deen. I love Luz in this. I mentioned in earlier threads about how, the second time through, I would notice all different things. Like how in Crossroads Talbert is suddenly very hot. And in Bastogne how Gordon is so lovable. For me, Last Patrol is where I fall in love with Luz. The first time(s) through the episode, of course I noticed all the shiny Lipton/Speirs and Webster/Liebgott stuff and Winters being even more awesome than ever.

But after that, I noticed Luz. He is so cute in that first scene. Nice to Webster, giving Lipton all the cranky love --- cigarette dangling as he covers him with a blanket and makes light of the pneumonia. Adorable. Then with the rations --- he's treating Web like a person, happy to see Perconte, down on Cobb. Then he just has to get out of there to do Actual Fighting while the boys squabble over candy bars. That moment when he defends Vest to Cobb, then takes off to blow up the house I feel a surge of love for him. He's the only grownup in the room right then and it's very attractive.

Then, at the end, he totally gets what he's witnessing in the other room, with Lip's promotion. And I don't know whether you can see it in the screencap above, but he's a little choked up there in the last shot. Love him.
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 05:23 pm (UTC)
He is that totally intellectual boy you knew in college who just had no idea that the world wasn't like what he had been reading about since he was 15 and discovered literature and philosophy. If he had been born just a little later he would have probably been one of those guys that read On The Road and decided to emulate Kerouac.

Forgot to say...love this. I think that's a good way to describe him.
tomfoolery815
Dec. 16th, 2008 05:36 pm (UTC)
Then, at the end, he totally gets what he's witnessing in the other room, with Lip's promotion. And I don't know whether you can see it in the screencap above, but he's a little choked up there in the last shot. Love him.
I loved that, that he wanted to watch Lip get promoted. Nice, also, that Welsh tells him "it's Harry."

Speaking of a little choked up ... I think Winters wipes away a tear after Nixon gives him his oak leaves. He closes the box they came in, then appears to dab the corner of his right eye with his thumb. Right before he says "I'll drive."
tomfoolery815
Dec. 16th, 2008 06:00 pm (UTC)
Do you guys think that Web was being modest about his fluency in German, or was he trying to duck the assignment by positioning his German as not as good as Liebgott's, who's already established as a fluent speaker? I first thought modest, but now I'm not so sure.

In any event, after Liebgott's reaction, Web does prove himself teachable. Outside, one man spits that Webster "tries to get out of everything," but he's headed over to the officers to get Liebgott out of the patrol. He needs the currency.
marymary
Dec. 16th, 2008 06:22 pm (UTC)
Do you guys think that Web was being modest about his fluency in German, or was he trying to duck the assignment by positioning his German as not as good as Liebgott's, who's already established as a fluent speaker?

I think he's being modest. Ducking the assignment doesn't fit his character. He's never done anything like that. In Replacments he puts himself in the patrol that goes back to look for Bull. We never see him really hesitating or trying to get out of anything. And he already feels like he's in trouble because he wasn't there in Bastogne, so I think the last thing he wants is to get out of something. Liebgott, with a totally different ethic and perspective on things, assumes Webster's trying to downplay his value as an interpreter and somehow weasel out.

The other thing is that I really don't think it makes any sense --- the idea that Webster's trying to get out of something in that way. I don't think Liebgott is really thinking, just snarking. Because it's not like Martin is going to change his mind about Webster at this point. I mean, do you hear the way Martin says "Webster" when he lists the assault team? Webster is going on the patrol. Saying his German isn't that good won't just suddenly get him out of it.
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